Find the Missing Millions

9 out of 10 people living with viral hepatitis are unaware

Where are the missing millions?

No one should have to live with viral hepatitis without knowing. Yet more than 290 million men, women and children globally do. Unless there is a massive scale-up in screening, diagnosis and linkage to care, more people will become infected and lives will continue to be lost.

“Find the Missing Millions” is a three-year global awareness-raising and advocacy campaign aimed at tackling the main barriers to diagnosis by putting civil society organisations and the affected community at the heart of the solution. All of which will contribute towards progressing WHO’s elimination target of a 30% diagnosis rate by 2020.

Hepatitis B and hepatitis C diagnosis rates

  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
Countries which have not yet reached WHO's interim diagnosis target of 30% by 2020
Countries which have already reached WHO's interim diagnosis target of 30% by 2020
Data not available
Data has been provided by the CDA Foundation and its Polaris Observatory. Hepatitis B and C diagnosis rates in 2017. Lafayette, CO: CDA Foundation, 2017.

Viral Hepatitis Self-Assessment Tool

More than 290 million people worldwide are living with viral hepatitis unaware. Are you?

Viral Hepatitis Self-Assessment Tool

More than 290 million people worldwide are living with viral hepatitis unaware. Are you?

Take a five-minute self-assessment test to find out.

Click here to begin

Viral hepatitis means inflammation of the liver caused by a virus. There are several different types of hepatitis viruses. In particular, types B and C lead to chronic disease in hundreds of millions of people and, together, are the most common cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer. Together, they affect 325 million people globally and account for over 1 million deaths per year.

The hepatitis B virus can be prevented through a vaccination and treated. The hepatitis C virus can be cured. 290 million people living with viral hepatitis are unaware of their condition. People can live with chronic hepatitis for decades without having symptoms.

This assessment will help determine if you should be tested for viral hepatitis.

Start

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Reusing needles and ink wells can put a person at an increased chance of living with viral hepatitis
Question 7 / 10
Viral hepatitis (hepatitis b and hepatitis C) is a bloodborne virus that remains infectious in dried blood for weeks. Without appropriate sterilisation of products which come into contact with blood, it can increase a person's risk of contracting viral hepatitis.
Question 8 / 10
Sexual behaviours that increase the potential for exposure to blood heighten the possibility of transmitting viral hepatitis: the risk to men who have sex with men (MSM) and other people who might have unprotected anal sex is higher than to the general population.
Question 9 / 10
Because razors, nail scissors, nail clippers, toothbrushes and possibly even towels may carry traces of blood, sharing them with an infected person may present a risk of acquiring viral hepatitis.
Question 10 / 10
Living with certain medical conditions can put you at a higher risk of living with viral hepatitis.

Based on your answers, it's unlikely you are living with hepatitis B or hepatitis C. However, if you are concerned we recommend that you speak to a primary healthcare practitioner.

More than 290 million people are living with viral hepatitis unaware.

Join the quest to find the missing millions

Based on your answers, there may be a chance you are living with hepatitis B or hepatitis C. We suggest that you contact your primary healthcare practitioner for a hepatitis B and hepatitis C test.

If you live in Europe check out the European Centre for Disease Control's Test Finder. For people living in the US, you can find out where to get tested here. If testing or information on where to find a test is unavailable to you, we suggest you contact a member of the World Hepatitis Alliance in your country to find out more information about testing or vaccination in your country.

More than 290 million people are living with viral hepatitis unaware.

Join the quest to find the missing millions